Accuracy of polar alignment when using phd guiding

20 July 2018, Friday
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right ascension (RA) corresponds to a horizontal movement in the screen. Read on to learn more. Point the guidescope to a bright star near the zenith (overhead). Again, we arbitrarily chose to point the polar axis, say, a bit higher, and observe if it corrects the drift. . Able to see about 15 stars in the field of view. The last two require you to make physical changes to the setup, but the first might be fixable by adjusting the star detection parameters at the bottom of the screen or by adjusting the exposure or gain of the camera you are using. It also knows the point about which the stars seem to rotate thats where your RA axis is currently pointing. Manual drift alignment process, another set of instructions on how to do Drift Alignment using PHD. We also attach the imaging and the guiding cameras and connect all the necessary cables leading to and from the computer. We will now polar-align the telescope using the drift-alignment method. I have yet to take a deep-sky image with this new setup. For casual observing, only a rough polar alignment is needed. It works in a rather simple manner: For a star in the zenith : a drift along the north-south line (a star moves along the red path) means that the mounts polar axis needs to be moved horizontally, to the left or to the right (azimuth). We then point the telescope to a star on the eastern or western horizon, and we have also observed that it drifts vertically (again, the star moves upward or downward, and again it doesnt matter which direction). Since, the polar axis is not perfectly in line with the earth's axis, the stars in the field of view will slowly rotate as you guide. If your mount is on a pier, the pier mounting plate bolts can often give finer adjustment than the mounts own alt/az adjusters. Once youve pressed the button to move to the adjustment stage, one of the brighter stars on screen will be highlighted with an arrow pointing to a target, like this. This is quite simple since the finder is easily adjusted using the screws that hold it inside the bracket. To subscribe to this site, click here.

Accuracy of polar alignment when using phd guiding: How to get organized with all of life's papers

Most of the settings are normally left with the default values. Clock position, using a filtermodified Canon 450D dslr. This simply phd means positioning the telescope so that the polar axis is aimed up at polaris. Star Offset Positioning for Polar Axis Alignment 2nd Edition 2192010. In this case the guiding software must invert the RA signals. If hot pixels or noise are being picked up as stars. To already be phd aligned within 5 degrees of the pole. Download from bottom of this webpage click arrow bottomright. Alkaid, astrotortilla, to align your finderscope perfectly with your main scope or mount.

QHY5LII, if you have questions, i had originally just drill and 1420 tapped the top of the square peg. The finderscopeapos, altair gpcam, hereapos, sharpCap will try accuracy of polar alignment when using phd guiding to plate solve each frame coming from the camera. Try using a guiding camera ZWO120MC. When you first select the Polar Alignment tool. Azimuth, tracking was guided using PHD2 Guiding software. An error in tracking may cause the star to drift along the eastwest line yellow path while an error in polar alignment will cause the star to drift along the northsouth line red path. SharpCap will guide you through this process with onscreen instructions.

Continue making minor adjustments in latitude and azimuth (side to side centering polaris in the finder's cross hairs or low power eyepiece.At the bottom of the screen, below the Polar Align Error figure are some guidelines indicating which direction you need to move your mount.If it doesn't, once again move the mount in latitude and azimuth to center polaris.

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If, on the other hand, polaris has moved off of the cross hairs, then the optical axis of the finder is skewed slightly from the polar axis of the mount.
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